Category Archives: AS Level

A useful revision PowerPoint on A Streetcar Named Desire…

Framework for analysis for A Level English Language/Literature

 

Word classes: nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs,

Syntax: Sentence moods: declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory; sentence types: minor, simple, complex; listing: syndetic and asyndetic;

(Syndetic means connected by a conjunction, asyndetic means with a comma instead of a conjunction.
Syndetic: Birds flock and wheel and cry.
Asyndetic: Birds flock, wheel, and cry.)

Ellipsis: The omission from speech or writing of a word or words that are superfluous or be understood from contextual clues.

  • A set of dots indicating such an omission.

Vocabulary: connotations, semantic fields;

Figurative language: metaphor, simile, personification, symbolism

Register: Formal, informal: genre, audience, topic

Grammar:

Lexis

Phonology: Alliteration, assonance, onomatopoeia, rhyme

Tenses: past, present, future

Narrative viewpoint: 1st person, 2nd person, 3rd person.

Scene 7 — How shocking are the relevations about Blanche in this scene?

Learning Objectives: to develop your ability to use appropriate terminology; to learn how to analyse and interpret.

How does Williams make this moment so revealing?

STELLA: This is making me — sick!

STANLEY: The boy’s dad learned about it and got in touch with the high school superintendent. Boy, oh, boy, I’d like to have been in that office when Dame Blanche was called on the carpet! I’d like to have seen her trying to squirm out of that one! But they had her on the hook good and proper that time and she knew that time and she knew that the jig was all up! They told her she better move on to some fresh territory. Yep, it was practickly a town ordinance passed against her!

The bathroom door is open and BLANCHE thrusts her head out holding a towel about her hair.

BLANCHE: Stella!

STELLA (faintly) Yes, Blanche?

BLANCHE: Give me another bath-towel to dry my hair with. I’ve just washed it.

When analysing think about:

Word classes: nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs,

Syntax: Sentence moods: declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory; sentence types: minor, simple, complex; listing: syndetic and asyndetic;

(Syndetic means connected by a conjunction, asyndetic means with a comma instead of a conjunction.

Syndetic: Birds flock and wheel and cry.

Asyndetic: Birds flock, wheel, and cry.)

Ellipsis: The omission from speech or writing of a word or words that are superfluous or be understood from contextual clues.

  • A set of dots indicating such an omission.

Vocabulary: connotations, semantic fields;

Figurative language: metaphor, simile, personification, symbolism

Register: Formal, informal: genre, audience, topic

Grammar:

Lexis

Phonology: Alliteration, assonance, onomatopoeia, rhyme

Tenses: past, present, future

Narrative viewpoint: 1st person, 2nd person, 3rd person.

Scene 4: How does Williams make the changing relationships in the play intriguing? How does he make Blanche such complex and fascinating character?

Learning Objectives: to develop your ability to ask high-order questions; to learn how to interrogate a text in depth; to learn to use some relevant A Level Language terminology

Scene 4: How does Williams make the changing relationships in the play intriguing? How does he make Blanche such a complex and fascinating character?

Read the scene in groups and hold an in-depth discussion about it.

In your group, each person will have a specific question word to ask around the group.

TERMINOLOGY TO USE AND LEARN: Nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs; spot them and say what the EFFECT is of the noun/verb/adjective/adverb etc…

PERSON 1: What? What has happened? What makes this noun/verb/adjective/adverb/word/image particularly important/significant/dramatic? What is the text’s purpose?

PERSON 2: Why? Why is this noun/verb/adjective/adverb/word/image particularly important/significant/dramatic/telling/thought-provoking?

PERSON 3: How? How is this author making this noun/verb/adjective/adverbs particularly exciting/suspenseful/intellectually stimulating?

PERSON 4: Who? Who is the most important/significant character in the scene? Who is the audience for this text?

HOMEWORK: Answer these two questions.

How does Williams make the changing relationships in the play intriguing? How does he make Blanche such complex and fascinating character?

How successful is the opening of Streetcar — Scene 1?

Please reply to this post for homework!

The opening of the play is crucial for many reasons; firstly, it has to engage the audience’s interest in the situation, the characters, the themes. How does this play do this?

Look at this version to assist you and you may refer to it in your reply.